feathers
‘Feathers’ © 2017 Carlos Aleman

Inspired by the ever-growing interest in cosplay, this young woman shows her love for anime by identifying with the character of a frozen queen. The elaborate headdress and jewelry represent countless of hours preparation leading to a type of performance art. The painting is a mixture of pop and realism, emerging from a two dimensional representation with a feather boa soliciting our response or touch.

Press Release: Ai Bo Represention

WESTERN LOVE FOR ASIA!
PAINTER CARLOS ALEMAN SIGNS WITH AI BO GALLERY FOR EXCLUSIVE ART REPRESENTATION!

Mixed Media Paintings available on the Internet and Venues in North America!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

SUNRISE, FL (July 28, 2017) – Ai Bo Gallery has announced today that it signed an exclusive agreement with Carlos Aleman to represent his catalog of original paintings.

Aleman’s work includes Cosplay Defenders, inspired by Japanese ‘Manga’ comic books, the triumphant Kitsugi Samurai, a take on Japanese Anime and the tradition of ‘kintsugi,’ the art of repairing broken pottery with gold, Red, a girl wearing a traditional Chinese qipao depicting an emperor made of flowers, and Space Geisha: Ruler of the Galaxy, a blending of pop surrealism and steam-punk.

“Ai Bo Gallery is excited to add Carlos Aleman as one of our select group of represented artists” says Glenn Aber, Owner and Director of Ai Bo Gallery. “Carlos is able to identify present day cultural memes and translate them into a Zen-like, anime quality that transcends viewer’s everyday expectations.”

Aleman’s work emphasizes the popularity of Anime and Cosplay among the American youth, reflecting a geek culture spirit of the age that mutually inspires artist and art lover. Taking advantage of the zeitgeist, he conveys the more subtle and profound concepts of eastern thought such as mono no aware (an artistic sensitivity to the beauty of impermanence) with the seemingly frivolous pursuits of fashion and pop culture.

Aleman’s paintings will be offered in multiple platforms and venues (http://aibogallery.com) over the next several years with additional venues to be announced.

Contact: Glenn Aber, Owner & Director, Ai Bo Gallery – glenn@aibogallery.com

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Event schedule


The official schedule for Saturday 6/10/17!

12:00 p.m. – Cosplay prejudging
12:00 p.m. – Exhibitor area opens (Ballrooms)
12:00 p.m. – Food vendors open (Rotunda)
12:30 p.m. – “Ponyo,” rated G (Theatre)
2:30 p.m. – “Otaku Mode” Art Talk featuring Carlos Aleman (Theatre)
3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. – Calligraphy Art (Ballrooms)
3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. – Origami Workshops (Ballrooms)
3:30 p.m. – “My Neighbor Totoro,” rated G (Theatre)
4:00 p.m. – “Anime-Japan” Art Reception (Gallery)
5:30 p.m. – Final Cosplay Showing (Theatre); Prejudging at noon
7:00 p.m. – Yoshiko Taiko Dojo Drummers (Theatre); Tickets required

City of Sunrise Civic Ctr.
Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1863489450590765/

Taking the Stage

This is where I’ll be speaking on June 10th. -Hope you can make it! I sooo want to have the chance to tell you my thoughts about love, imagination and a life of creative fulfillment. This will be a preview of the workshop series I’ll be teaching this summer. Right after the talk (2:30pm) is my new exhibit opening (4:00pm)

Sunrise Civic Center Theatre and Art Gallery
10610 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Sunrise, FL 33351

Eventbrite:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/anime-exhibit-festival-tickets-30927131884

Facebook Event:  https://www.facebook.com/events/1863489450590765

Digital Kintsugi

‘Androgynous No. 20’

‘Androgynous No. 19’
‘Androgynous No. 19’

A couple of recent paintings, Androgynous No. 19 & 20.  The gold, dabbed over the faces of the models is inspired by Kintsugi, the Japanese technique of repairing pottery with gold powder and lacquer (as describe in an earlier post).  The actual painting technique—rectangles applied with a flat brush—came from an idea I had in a design class back in the ’80s around the time of the Challenger disaster.  The assignment:  An analogous color study.

On tiny pieces of paper, I watered down my acrylic paints and rendered rectangles, transitioning from one hue to another.  Even back then, one couldn’t help but think of a digital future, such as the one Salvador Dali perhaps hinted at in Lincoln in Dalivision.  30 years later, I still find something compelling about that artistic sentiment.  Whether Dali was remotely interested in technology or was primarily concerned with achieving an illusion with a photo-mosaic, as things turned out, the world has become quite pixelated indeed.

Add a little humanity in the mix and our cyber experience of life might look a little more like a van Gogh painting with thick gooey brushstrokes.  I wonder if van Gogh, who was an avid fan of Japanese art knew about kintsugi.  No doubt, the golden years of expression came out of deep personal brokenness.

So there you have it—kintsugi, Lincoln in Dalivision and van Gogh—all swirling around in my head as I try to depict androgynous models and the fascinating things they tell us without ever saying a word.